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New Flats Galore!

5 Aug

2014 is turning out to be a huge year for multi-residential construction. A few major architecture companies largely dominate this scene, with a few rather interesting creative developers too. Below are the main ones going up this year.

South

10 Rosebery: 88 apartments on Botany Road.
Asper, Roseberry www.asperroseberry.com.au
Architect: Turner Associates

  

15 Botany: Park Grove. 170 apartments.
Architect: Krikis Tayler

 

16 Brighton: Longbeach apartments 344 Bay Street Brighton Le Sands
Architect: Tony Owen Partners (wow…!)

   

30 564 Princes Highway, Rockdale.
Architect: a+ design group aplusdg.com

31 Wolli Creek: three new buildings at Australand’s Discovery Point and the third stage of Southbank by Winten.
Southbank, Wolli Creek www.southbankwollicreek.com.au  http://www.winten.com.au/
Architect:

  

32 Woolooware: 600 apartments at the Bluestone new community Woolooware Bay. $300 million
Woolooware Bay Town Centre on the Cronulla Sutherland Leagues Club site, Shark Park.
Architect: Retail: Scott Carver and landscape architects Aspect Studios. Residential: Turner Associates.
220 apartments within three separate buildings ranging from a height of seven to twelve storeys.
http://www.jbaplanning.com.au/news/news-details/approved-major-new-developments-at-shark-park

     

42
Moss Wood Residence, 21-35 Princes Highway, Kogarah
84 Residential Apartments rising 10 storeys
Developer: Deicorp D&C

 

49.
East at Erkohttp://www.eastaterko.com.au/
41 apartments
Architect: SJB Architects (looks very similar to what they did at Harold Park (that turned out very well)).

   

50.
Breeze development, Little Bay
52 apartments
Architect:

————

North

11 Beecroft: 170 apartments.

18 Panorama Crows Nest: Willoughby Road.
Architect: JPRA for Barana Group
http://www.panoramacrowsnest.com.au/

 

20 Dee Why Grand: 150 apartments.
Architect: Fitzgerald Bennett
and 2-10 Mooramba Road Dee Why
 

24 Lane Cove: second stage of the DHA development of 170 homes. Arcadia. ‘Tree house’ apartments.
Crimson Hill, Lindfield. Defence Housing Australia (old UTS Ku-ring-gai Campus)
Architect: Architectus

  

26 Meadowbank, Shepherds Bay. 2000 new apartments. 2-8 Rothesay Avenue Meadowbank
Holdmark Property Group. 15-storey landmark tower with others stepped between 4 and 12 levels
Architect: Robertson + Marks

  

29 9 Atchison St ST LEONARDS: 60 apartments.
Architect: a+ design group aplusdg.com

 

38.
Alcove, Killeaton Street, St Ives.
300 apartments across six buildings. Meriton.

40,
Pymble Grand.
Architect: Mackenzie Architects
Developer: Modern Construction & Development.
Two five-storey blocks with 50 units.

48
The Sydney, at Macquarie Park Village near North Ryde
152 apartments offered in 23-level tower
Architect: Allen Jack + Cottier

53. Plaza 88, Archer Street, Chatswood. 212 serviced apartments
Architect: Marchese Partners (auspicious numbering…)

63.
Aurora, 3-9 Finlayson Street, Lane Cove.
Architect: designed by Angelo Candalepas and Associates and developed by MV Projects.

 

64.
Emerant Lane. 85 apartments. Lane Cove.
Architect: developed by SAKKARA with designs by dKO Architects.

65.
The Botanic, Finlayson Street, Lane Cove.
Architect: SJB Interiors, Mijollo Architects, Greenbush Group, Icon Co.

————

West

12. Altitude Apartments, 330 Church Street, Parramatta
Architect: Tony Caro for Meriton
53 levels. Meriton (wow…)

  

27 Parramatta: 450 apartments at Riverside.
Crown Group’s $309 million residential tower, V by Crown, twin commercial towers by Johnson Pilton Walker,
Architect: Johnson Pilton Walker Architects
Developer: Crown Group
$250 million development

36.
290-292 Parramatta Road, Auburn
1000 apartments
Architect: Cox Architecture

37.
Flemington markets
Up to 10,000 apartments in 30 storey towers.
Architect: Group GSA

41
Little Saigon Plaza, 462 Chapel Road, Bankstown
Retail and commercial
Developer: Deicorp D&C

 

43
Broadway Plaza, The Broadway Punchbowl
10,000m2 of Retail and 152 Residential Apartments within 7 buildings rising 5 storeys
Developer: Deicorp D&C

54. Centric Parnell Street, Strathfield
Architect: SJB Architects
http://www.centricstrathfield.com.au/Architecture/

55.
Skypoint Towers,46-50 John St Lidcombe
9 storey. Completion 2016

56.
7 Deane Street BURWOOD
97 units plus 3 retail shops. Opposite Burwood Train Station.

57.
1-17 Elsie Street Burwood

  

61.
Aspire Tower
Architect: Grimshaw
160-182 Church Street, Parramatta,
336 m (1,102 ft), 90 stories.

————

East

13 Bondi: 200-plus apartments from Mirvac on Ocean Street.
Architect: Mirvac Design, TBA designer.

14 Bondi Junction: 129 new apartments from Leighton Properties. 20-level AQUA
Architect: kann finch group in collaboration with DC8 Studio. Koichi Takada Architects interiors.

————

Inner West

 

17 Canterbury: 170 apartments on Charles Street.
Habitat, Canterbury www.habitatcanterbury.com.au
Architect: Turner & Associates

  

21 Erskineville: a new development of 200 apartments, Eve by Fridcorp.
Eve by Fridcorpwww.evebyfridcorp.com.au
Address: Corner of Eve and McDonald Streets Erskineville.
Architect: DKO

 

22 Five Dock: 155-159 Parramatta Road, Five Dock
1300 apartments
Architect:  Allan, Jack and Cottier for Crown International Holdings and Drivas Property Group

      

23 Forest Lodge: 300 more lots in new stages of Mirvac’s Harold Park development.
Altivolo, Harold Park (Precinct 4)
Architect: Developer: Mirvac Design

 

25
DeiCota Tower, Redfern St Redfern
Developer: Deicorp Design & Construct

 

34. Earlwood
Elysium Apartments
Address: 17-25 William Street, Earlwood.

 

35.
The Flour Mill at Summer Hill, where 300 apartments are planned
Architect: Hassell

 

44
Revolution Apartments, Illawarra Road, Marrickville
180 Residential Units spread over 4 buildings
Developer: Deicorp D&C

 

45
Urba, Gibbons St Redfern
19 Storey mixed use Developments. Retail, commercial and 135 Apartments.
Developer: Deicorp D&C

 

46
Alpha Apartments, 20 McGill Street, Lewisham.
68 Residential Apartments rising 6 storeys
Developer: Deicorp D&C

 

58.
22 George Street Leichhardt (former Kolotex Glo factory)
rezoned from industrial to B4 mixed use
244 apartments, with 1,126 square metres of mixed-use space, with three street frontages.
Architect: SJB Architects
Greenland paid $47.1 million for the site.

 

59.
Homebush’s Town Centre
The Crescent, near Homebush station
12 storey block on the site of the sub branch of the RSL

 

60.
2A Brown Street Ashfield
Architect: Olsson and Assoc.
Two 8 storey mixed use buildings. 120 apartments plus retail.

City

 

 

19 Darling Harbour: 1400 apartments
First stage:
Darling Sqwww.darlingsq.com
Architect: Denton Corker Marshall (DCM) for Lend Lease
Darling Square, The Boulevard, Sydney

 

 

 

33. City
Greenland Centre www.greenlandcentre.com.au  (old Sydney Water Headquarters, 1965)
Address: 115 Bathhurst Street Sydney. 236 metres.
Architect: bligh voller nield Donovan Hill and WoodsBagot
two-bedroom apartments (76 -88sqm) from $1,325,000 and three beds (105-143sqm) from $2.2 million.
1930s building next door to become a hotel
Architect: Peddle Thorp Architects and Laboratory for Visionary Architecture (LAVA)

 

 

 

51.
Harbour Mill Apartments, Pyrmont.
http://www.hessiandesign.com/grimshaw/
Architect: Grimshaw. Developer- Ceerose.

 

 

52. The Quay. $280 million. http://www.wmkarchitecture.com/
Quay Street, Haymarket
Architect: WMK

62
Barangaroo Apartments
Lend Lease. 159 apartments
Architect: Richard Francis-Jones of Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp and Andrew Andersons of Peddle Thorp Architects
two apartment complexes will become the first in the Barangaroo South region

Recent inner-city developments- CBD Low/Mid Rise (under 10 levels)

8 Jul

01- Cheese Grater (Architects- Allen Jack+Cottier)

Spunky new educational bldg DA as part of UTS (1 -3macarthur st)
cnr Macarthur st/bay sts
International Grammar School

02 15-35 chippendale student accommodation (architects- Silvester Fuller)

Here’s a render – looks better as a model. The architects (Silvester Fuller) are based in Australia, but I guess that doesn’t mean they’re not American. The owners of the building are American, however – it’s student accommodation for Boston University.
Original design from rising star TONY OWEN. Not half as good as what was finally built.

03- Belmore Park substation
The more I think about this one the more of a wasted opportunity this really is.
The 1918 Sydney hotel which was pulled down for current carpark.

04- New HQ for Google in Pyrmont- Workplace6. 6-Star Green Star-designed. (architects- Nettleton Tribe).

05- SUSSEX HAY CENTRE – 405-411 SUSSEX STREET, HAYMARKET (architects- Crone Partners Architecture Studios)

Demolition of the existing 5-6 storey buildings and construction of an 8 storey building with 2 levels of basement parking for 23 cars and lower ground supermarket, retail and restaurant at ground and first floors and 6 levels of commercial offices above.
It’s called the Sussex Hay Centre. You aren’t going to be happy with what they replaced, and what with (well I know I’m not, over 100 year old heritage lost!).

Here’s a Flickr website dedicated to what has been lost –
http://www.flickr.com/groups/688094@N20/

Here’s what the old 2 buildings looked like –

06- Dominion. 299 Forbes st, Darlinghurst. (architects- Group GSA)
At it’s highest point (about 30m down Burton Street), it’s about 29m from street level to the top of the lift overrun. At the corner of Forbes and Burton Streets it’s about 23m (7 storeys); at the corner of Burton and Bourke Streets it’s 24m (7 storeys).

A new Dominion to rise in Darlinghurst
8 July 2010

St Hilliers and Cbus Property have launched Dominion, a 110 luxury apartment development in Darlinghurst, Sydney.

The development is located on the site of the former Caritas healthcare facility, which St Hilliers acquired from St Vincent’s Hospital in 2008 with concept plan approval for a medium density residential and commercial development.

The triangular site is bounded by the famous Darlinghurst Gaol, now the National Art School, the NSW Supreme Court and the former heritage Darlinghurst Police Station.

The building was designed by Group GSA, with interiors by SJB Architects.

Architecturally, the approach has been to create three new buildings unified on a contiguous sandstone base, which wraps around the site and is in keeping with the historic surrounds. The base houses around 1,000 sqm of retail and commercial areas.

The Bourke, Burton and Forbes residences are low-rise buildings which feature an architectural profile of steel, glass and louvres and floating roofs. Four apartments housed within two adapted heritage buildings retained on the site blend heritage features and contemporary style.

Utilising the large frontages and stepped unit façade layout, over 90 per cent of the units are cross-ventilated.

The development as a whole aims to achieves a 5 star NatHERS environmental rating.

Construction of the development is expected to commence in December 2010 and will take 18 months to complete.

07- ‘Eden’ 19-31 Goold Street, Chippendale: (Architect: Tony Owen)

On a sadder note, a new DA is in for 19-31 Goold Street, Chippendale, and those terrific swooping and swaying lines of the rear of the building have been ‘rationalised’ into something much straighter and more conventional and much less interesting. What grey cardigan’s bloody idea was that?! 8 storeys 26 apt.

08- EastExchange. The extension to the old East telephone exchange at 320 Liverpool Street, Darlinghurst.

http://www.eastexchange.com.au/
Developed by Maygood Australia.
A 1923 stripped classical style public works building designed by E.H. Henderson.

09- Luxe Apartments in Woolloomooloo. The site – currently a hole – sits between Sir John Young Crescent and Crown Street.
A large hole in the ground on the site of the former Sydney Eye Hospital in Woolloomooloo is set to become twin seven-storey apartment blocks (has been gathering puddles and graffiti since the late 1990s).
Developer- Investment group FKP. The new $95 million blocks will be called Luxe and contain 77 apartments with an average price of $1 million.
The buildings were designed by architects Marchese Partners International and modified by Krikis Tayler Architects.

10- DA in for Student Housing, 1 Regent Street, Chippendale.
DA submitted 2007.

11- Glass box atop Louis Vuitton’s new flagship store, on the corner of King and George. (architects- Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp).
Formerly The Blacket Hotel. Developer- Kingvest Pty Ltd.

TONY OWEN NEW APARTMENT BUILDING AS WORK OF URBAN ART

27 Apr

The latest building by Tony Owen blurs the line between architecture and urban billboard. Work has commenced on the EDEN apartments in Sydney.

This infill project is located in a varied and complex part of the Sydney cityscape and is visible from many vantages. The office sought to explore the possibilities of adding to the tapestry as a piece of art in the urban landscape. In a unique approach, the final image was chosen from an on-line poll of various options to allow the public to decide the streetscape of their city.

Vertical louvres of varying colours and textures create a pattern on the eight-storey facade that is discernable only from a distance.
Up close it’s just a part of the colour of the city, by when viewed from afar a distinct image emerges of fabric flowing in the breeze.


Five visual concepts were trialed, including the face of a beautiful woman, and subjected to an on-line vote on architect Tony Owen’s website. Some Council officers even registered their preference, with the abstract fabric design being judged more appropriate than the graphic of the attractive blonde, the floating clouds, the cityscape and the CBD skyline.

Eden will have 24 apartments in a diverse mix of layouts, from one to three-bedrooms. The two-storey configurations may have their roots in a traditional Victorian terrace but these have evolved into modern habitats with high ceilings, dramatic voids, double-height windows and wintergardens.


The vertical louvres are there for more than just show; they function for sun control, privacy, and help to modulate temperatures within the apartments.
Interiors are bold, with colourful tiles, geometric-patterned wallpaper, exposed storage options, modular joinery, and kitchens designed as large pieces of furniture to maximise the space.

Tony Owen's Moebius house

1 Feb

The Moebius house faces onto views of the Opera House and Harbour Bridge. The architects responded to the site with a series of movements which folded and twisted the space in order to maximise the changes of level, view opportunities and potential for connectivity to outside spaces at various ground planes.

The house has a fluidity of space which is a direct result of having a strong relationship with the surrounding landscape. Both houses represent a fluid response to design that Tony Owen NDM Architects call ‘elastic architecture’. They describe such architecture as being pliant, with an inherent structure and ordering principle. It is an architecture that is capable of responding to all manner of changing variables and which expand to allow greater connectivity to the exterior environment to maximise light, air and movement flows, or retract for greater privacy and differentiation of uses.

Tony Owen NDM Architects

Images-
http://www.architectureanddesign.com.au/article/First-look-Moebius-House-Sydney/510162.aspx
www.tonyowen.com.au
A Möbius strip made with a piece of paper and tape. If an ant were to crawl along the length of this strip, it would return to its starting point having traversed every part of the strip without ever crossing an edge.

 

The Möbius strip has provided inspiration both for sculptures and for graphical art. The artist M. C. Escher was especially fond of it and based several of his lithographs on it. One famous example, Möbius Strip II, features ants crawling around the surface of a Möbius strip.

It is also a recurrent feature in science fiction stories, such as Arthur C. Clarke’s The Wall of Darkness. Science fiction stories sometimes suggest that our universe might be some kind of generalised Möbius strip. In the short story A Subway Named Möbius, by A.J. Deutsch, the Boston subway authority builds a new line, but the system becomes so tangled that it turns into a Möbius strip, and trains start to disappear. The Möbius strip also features prominently in Brian Lumley’s Necroscope series of novels.

Alan Watts refers to the Möbius strip, in Chapter Two (The Mythology of Hinduism) of his transcribed lectures The Philosophies of Asia, as a possible exception to the law of polarity.

Delaney Bramlett also recorded and released an album in 1973 entitled Mobius Strip, possibly because of its technical use in magnetic tape equipment, possibly because of its poetic significance, probably both. None of the tracks on the album share the name.