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2014 is a huge year for Sydney glitz and glam.

16 May

2014 is a huge year for Sydney glitz and glam.

A number of old icons are being razed for new icons. Each one of the below buildings are world class.

Under construction

140507-C01-001

Barangaroo
International Towers | 49st, 43st, 39st / 217m, 178m, 168m /
Architect- various

The fantastic Barangaroo is emerging from the primordial soup of east Darling Harbour.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW04.htm

140507-C02-003

140507-C02-014

20 Martin Place
Architect- Crone Partners in collaboration with James Carpenter Design Associates (NY).

A dazzling glass Miesien box to replace the seventies dazzling glass Miesien box. The main part of the renaissance of Martin Place. The architects have moved the circulation cores out of the main floor area. The old building was reduced to a fantastic steel skeleton.
Crones are so hot right now!
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd5-16.htm

140507-C03-020

5 Martin Place
Architect- Johnson Pilton Walker with Tanner Kibble Denton Architects.

A rather sympathetic and sophisticated approach to the sandstone canyon of Martin Place. Compliments the Commonwealth Bank money-box building next door.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd5-04.htm

140507-C04-001

Macquarie Martin Place headquarters
48 Martin Place.
Architect- Johnson Pilton Walker

This one looks like great fun. The architects have created a central void and a vast domed skylight.
A real urban testament to the money and glamour of banking (like something out of a Batman movie!).
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd5-08.htm

140507-C05-003

UTS Information Technologies Engineering Building (Broadway)
Architect- Denton Corker Marshall (DCM)

I’m not sure how this will turn out. It is pretty cool to look at, but it’s such an ugly monolithic metallic slug on such an important site that I think in ten years time it may be reviled (especialy if the cladding rusts). Cubist marshmallow!
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-023.htm

140507-C06-003

Urbanest student housing Wattle Street.
Architect- GROUP GSA

I’ve included this to show some interesting contextual stuff going up. Again part of the incredibly dynamic Haymarket district.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-026.htm

140507-C07-007

Dr Chau Chak Wing Building, UTS
Ultimo
Architect- Frank Gehry

Wow- my brain hurts thinking about the brickwork in this building. Indulgent but delightful (essence of architecture, right?).
Good to see an iconic education building on this site on the end of the Goods Line pathway.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-021.htm

140507-C08-007

180 Thomas Street, Haymarket.
Architect- Bates Smart

A speculative corporate response to the same site as above (Goods Line pathway), sitting on top of an existing substation.
A really good effort by Bates Smart if you ask me.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-025.htm

140507-C09-001

Central Park
on Broadway near Central Station
Architect- Norman Foster + Partners + Ateliers Jean Nouvel

Zipping along, needless to say…
Designed by Jean Nouvel, the development encompasses a shopping mall and apartment complex, with vertical gardens featuring on its facade.
Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW15.htm

Under demolition and site prep.

140507-D01001

140507-D01009

Sydney Convention Centre
Darling Harbour
Architect- Hassell

Big things are planned for this site. After a tortuous couple of months the original Convention Centre (flagship of the eighties Darling Harbour) has all but disappeared.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/PYR/PYR17.htm

140507-D02-007

The Castlereagh
Architect- Tony Owen

More sleek plastic for downtown Sydney, to keep the overseas investors happy.
It replaces a rather staid 1920s job.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd6-020.htm

140507-D03-010

33 Bligh Street
Architect- Fitzpatrick and Partners with Kannfinch

This is an ambitious and exciting building. It can get to be so high as the building itself sits on top of a large substation (to be hidden behind a huge sandstone screen).
It replaces a graceful but clapped out late sixties building.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW33.htm

140507-D04-011

333 George Street.
Architect- Crone / Grimshaw

Here’s an exciting building on a great site. It’s good to see this part of town slowly come back to life (with then night clubs, etc).
When George Street become a pedestrian area this site will soar. It will house the local branch of Marks and Sparks.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW34.htm

Recently Finished

140507-F01-014

8 Chifley
Architect- Richard Rogers of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, and Lippmann Associates in association with Mirvac Design.

Not as exciting as the renderings, but an excellent addition to the streetscape.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW18.htm

140507-F02-015

Eliza Apartments
Architect- Tony Owen

This is a wee bourgeois gem. Check out the stonework at street level- really creative.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW-SM22.htm

Epilogue
This city has no shortage of capital compared to other cities, look at the dollars being spent on projects around the city this decade.
Lets see, short list I quickly compiled.
$30b transport plan from the NSW government. Light rail, North West Rail Link, M5, M4 extension etc.
$8b Green Square/Zetland
$6b Barangaroo Lend Lease contract + $1b Crown Casino
$2.5b Darling Harbour redevelopment, Lend Lease contract (this company is obviously scratching the right backs in government)
$2b Central park
$1.3b City One/Wynyard Station
$1b AMP/Circular Quay
$1b UTS redevelopments

It’s is after 10 years of non spending post Olympics.

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August Construction update

1 Aug

There are half a dozen fantastic projects going up within half a mile of Central Station.

Here are some recent update pictures (changing rapidly…)

01. Central Park

That heliport still amazes me every time I walk past it. And the greenery growing on the walls. Talk about smoke and mirrors. However, it does work to set this development apart from the other boring stuff. And the site is superb too.

More images- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW15.htm

01A 01B 01C

02. 163 Castlereagh Street (ANZ Tower).

Up in mid-town, the new ANZ tower by Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp (FJMT) has turned out wonderfully. The good detailing and sense of design that FJMT usually display on their libraries (etc) is here employed to make some urbanely relaxed inner city spaces.

More images- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW01.htm

 

02A 02B 02C

03.  Construction of the new 14-storey faculty UTS ITE Building dramatically sheathed in angular aluminium on the corner of Broadway and Jones Street. A somewhat disturbingly modern (decon) facade (modern Brutalism..) facing the main entry to the city. This may turn out badly.

More images- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-023.htm

03A 03B 03C

04.  The UTS Dr Chau Chak Wing Building

Just down the road from the ITE Building is the new superstar-Gehry-designed Chau Chak Wing. The facade has not started to go on but it promises to be a good one. It is also sited on an old elevated disused railway corridor that promises to become a very interesting and dynamic part of Sydney.

More images- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-021.htm

 

04A

05. 180 Thomas Street, Haymarket. Bates Smart

Won through a City of Sydney Design Excellence Competition.
Very nice little office building, opposite the Gehry UTS building (on the old railway building. A conversion of a 10 year old plinth.

05A

 

05C

Above- a BS rendering of the completed project.

Broadway's role in city life on the rise

5 Dec

Kelsey Munro, Jen Rosenberg SMH December 3, 2011

The price of good design


IN A few years, an unloved and unlovely part of the city will have been transformed into ”a gallery of eminent architects”, with new buildings by three Pritzker Prize winners, a 6400-square-metre park and a power station.

Investments totalling $1.5 billion from the University of Technology, Sydney, along with the joint venture developing the former Carlton&United Breweries site near Central Station, are set to reshape the southern end of the city centre.

On Broadway’s south side, a 33-storey residential tower shrouded in elaborate vertical gardens is rising around a new landscaped park, remnant brewery buildings and a planned tri-generation power station to supply the new complex.


Terraced gardens at One Central Park. Artist’s impression.

A cantilevered heliostat at the top of the building will direct light into the complex and become a digital artwork at night.

One Central Park


One Central Park, Sydney. Artist’s impression.

”There’s no doubt it’s going to be a stunning transformation over the next five years,” Guy Pahor, of Frasers Property, said.

Frasers is developing the One Central Park site in a joint venture with Sekisui House. ”Broadway’s going to be transformed, not just by the nature and volume of the construction, but the quality – call it a gallery of eminent architects,” he said.

With Gehry, there are Jean Nouvel, Richard Johnson, Norman Foster and vertical-garden pioneer Patrick Blanc in the internationals.


Atelier Jean Nouvel, residential towers with the heliostat illuminated at night time. Central Park. Artist’s impression.

Australian firms include Tzannes Associates, Tonkin Zulaikha Greer, Denton Corker Marshall and Durbach Block Jaggers.

Gehry, Nouvel and Foster have won the Pritzker, architecture’s highest honour.

When the first stage of One Central Park is finished in late 2013, there will be about 1900 new apartments for 2500 residents and space for 5400 workers in offices and a four-storey mall.


Richard Johnson buildings, Cental Park. Artist’s impression.

The developer has worked to sway objectors angry at the height of the towers, holding several community forums, investing in a public art program and allowing local artists to work rent-free in heritage warehouses on the site.


Atelier Jean Nouvel, residential towers, Central Park. Artist’s impression.

UTS

For UTS, the development was as much about creating an education hub for the whole area as it was expanding its footprint, the vice-chancellor, Ross Milbourne, said.

”The exciting thing about this project is that it takes an area that has been quite rundown – it’s always been the poor cousin to the rest of Sydney – and it’s really reinventing itself to be a cultural and educational precinct.”

Across the road, the base of the 27-storey brutalist concrete UTS tower will be wrapped in an undulating glass facade, and construction starts in March on a new 14-storey faculty building dramatically sheathed in angular aluminium on the corner of Broadway and Jones Street.

Off Harris Street, the university is also building Australia’s first Frank Gehry building, with its distinctive crumpled facade and treehouse-like skeleton, which caused much controversy when plans were unveiled late last year.

UTS’s Dr Chau Chak Wing building, designed by Frank Gehry, his first Australian project. The 16,030-square-meter (172,545-square-foot) business school building at the University of Technology, Sydney, will have a “treehouse” design, incorporating a core yellow brick and crinkly glass structure, with “branches” spreading away from it, Gehry says.

Significantly, the site engages with the adjacent abandoned railway line and bridge and will feed into the pedestrian zone further up.

 

Professor Milbourne said the university had planned its growth to benefit students and the neighbourhood. ”We have a plan for student growth on our campus but part of it is to make it a better student experience, so more space for students … increasing student housing around this area and making it a safer environment,” he said.

The Broadway redesign links two other big redevelopments – Darling Harbour and Barangaroo – but has managed much of the latter’s controversy.

Professor Milbourne and the UTS deputy vice-chancellor (resources), Patrick Woods, attribute that to strong collaboration with the neighbours. These include the ABC, the Powerhouse Museum and TAFE.


Atelier Jean Nouvel, residential towers, Central Park. Artist’s impression.

David Riordan, director of TAFE NSW-Sydney Institute, said the relationship between the two institutions was very positive.

”This is going to be the hub of education in Australia and we believe that we’re here to meet those needs and that we’ll be a key player,” Mr Riordan said.

Copyright SMH

Gehry at UTS- the Dr Chau Chak Wing Building

16 Dec

The building is named for Australian-Chinese business leader Dr Chau Chak Wing who donated a total of $25 million to UTS; $20 million to support the new Business School designed by Frank Gehry, and an additional $5 million to create an endowment fund for Australia-China student scholarships. It is the first Australian building by Gehry Partners. About the building A key component of UTS’s City Campus Master Plan, the Dr Chau Chak Wing Building will provide teaching, learning, research and office accommodation for the UTS Business School. There will be extensive public spaces in the new building, including student lounges, cafes and outdoor roof terraces. The total project value is $150 million. The building will provide 16,030 sqm of space, spread over 11 floors. The UTS vision The University of Technology, Sydney has a singular vision, expressed in our strategic plan – to be a world-leading university of technology. To achieve this, our leadership in learning and teaching must be coupled with international renown in research, and a world-class infrastructure that supports our vibrant intellectual environment. The achievement of our vision relies on attracting high quality students, academics, researchers and administrators; people who are passionate about knowledge, learning, discovery and creativity. Gehry Partners, LLP Gehry Partners, LLP is a full service firm with broad international experience in academic, commercial, museum, performance, and residential projects. Frank Gehry established his practice in Los Angeles, California in 1962. The Gehry partnership, Gehry Partners, LLP, was formed in 2001 and currently supports a staff of over 120 people. Frank Gehry is among the world’s best-known architects. His milestone projects include the Bilbao Guggenheim Museum and the Los Angeles Walt Disney Concert Hall. Every project undertaken by Gehry Partners is designed personally and directly by Frank Gehry. Ross Milbourne, UTS Vice-Chancellor & President Professor Milbourne received his Bachelors and Masters degrees from the University of NSW, and his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. His interests have been in the general area of macroeconomics and, in particular, the mathematical modelling and statistical testing of macroeconomic theories. During the last decade his research has focused on economic growth in open economies – economies that allow free international movement of goods and capital. His previous appointments include Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research) at the University of New South Wales, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) at the University of Adelaide and Chair of the Research Grants Committee of the Australian Research Council. Philanthropy Australian-Chinese business leader Dr Chau Chak Wing has donated a total of $25 million to UTS; $20 million to support the new Business School designed by Frank Gehry, and an additional $5 million to create an endowment fund for Australia-China student scholarships. The gift makes Dr Chau one of the leading philanthropists in the Asia-Pacific region. In recognition of the gift – the largest ever made to an Australian university – UTS Council determined to name the new Gehry-designed Business School building the Dr Chau Chak Wing Building. Design & construction timeframe Construction will start in early 2012 and be complete in time for the 2014 Academic year. In January 2011, UTS will undertake community and stakeholder consultation on the new design. This consultation forms part of the “Part 3A” submission that UTS will make to the NSW Department of Planning for approval of the design. Economic and tourism benefits The Dr Chau Chak Wing building is the centrepiece of the $1 billion City Campus Master Plan which is expected to generate an estimated $3.2 billion in NSW economic activity. 1,700 jobs are expected to be generated each year over the 10-year construction period. The Chau building is estimated to attract 24,000 interstate visitors and 2,000 international visitors each year, adding $36 million to the tourism industry through spending by business event visitors annually. Source: Independent modelling by Urbis. Local team A local consultant team – comprising Australian architects Daryl Jackson Robin Dyke, engineers and other specialist disciplines – has been appointed to work alongside Gehry Partners. For the full project team listing visit the project page. Sustainability The Master Plan is integral to UTS achieving its greenhouse gas emission reduction targets and a variety of holistic sustainability goals. As one of the new buildings proposed by the Master Plan, UTS and Gehry Partners intend to seek a 5-Star Green Star Educational Building Rating for the Dr Chau Chak Wing Building. Source- http://www.fmu.uts.edu.au/masterplan/media/drchau/links.html Websites

Articles

2010

   

2009

Prize-winner's magnetic charms draw a crowd

22 Jan

Bryce Hallett, 11/12/2009 Source: Sydney Morning Herald

“ARCHITECTURE should speak of its time and place, but yearn for timelessness,” says Frank Gehry, the Pritzker Prize-winning architect based in Los Angeles.

gehry

The soaring wings, titanium-clad surfaces and interlocking forms of his best-known buildings, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, achieve a level of free-flowing fancy that few of his peers can match. Like Gehry’s jewellery designs for Tiffany & Co, his most striking edifices symbolise ambition, status and wealth. They are shrines created in prosperity.

“I think my best skill as an architect is the achievement of hand-to-eye co-ordination,” Gehry once said. “I am able to transfer a sketch into a model, into the building.” Continue reading

Ultimo site gets ultimate architect – Frank Gehry

21 Jan

THE acclaimed architect Frank Gehry, who creates buildings that ”look like a party of drunken robots got together to celebrate”, is about to unleash his vision for Sydney.

uts-gehry-005

The University of Technology, Sydney yesterday announced that Mr Gehry, who designed the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, will create a concept design to transform a former industrial site at Ultimo into a building of international repute.

uts-gehry-001

The new Faculty of Business building will be the 80-year-old architect’s first in Australia, pending the university’s council approval of his finished concept design next year. The building, on the former Dairy Farmers site wedged between the ABC Ultimo Centre and the Powerhouse Museum, will house an estimated 2000 students and more than 400 academics. Continue reading