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Central Park West? New development for Parramatta downtown.

18 Dec

Here are pictures of the winning scheme for the new two 53-storey office towers, designed by Sydney firm Johnson Pilton Walker, will be built as part of the Parramatta Square redevelopment in the CBD.

I think that they look hugely like the Central Park development in the city at Broadway.

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The buildings feature a sky terrace on the 25th floor and a sky lobby on the 27th floor which jut out from the tower, offering sweeping views to the Sydney CBD and across the west towards the Blue Mountains.

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When constructed, the commercial towers will add up to 140,000 square metres of office space to the Parramatta CBD and function as two of the key centrepieces of the three-hectare Parramatta Square site in the heart of the CBD.
The original 4 short-lited from the competition (chosen from a field of 73 designs):

01. Mario Cucinella Architects’ offering for Parramatta Square Stages 5 & 6

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02. Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp’s design concept

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03. Johnson Pilton Walker’s design concept

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04. Bates Smart’s design concept

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Central Park retail is photogenic..

17 Nov

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Wow, I mean very nice, obviously. The Germans in the office swan around speaking of “European architecture”- obviously, the towers at Central Park are just boxes covered with gimicks, but wonderfully done. Quite an oasis from an otherwise chaotic part of the city. Above we see the main residentail tower (Jean Nouvel?) with its fantastic hanging gardens. At the base of this is the retail component that opened very recently.

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A closer view of the shopfronts. Huge shopfronts (around five meters or fifteen feet) with a token awning above.

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Mirrored ceiling at the entry area.

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Once I got in I was pleased by the simplicity of the deign. The plain white uncomplicated ceilings and returns and the dark stone floors (becoming the norm in fashion retail..).

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The ceiling has a vast skylight with about a foot of water held on top- the small waves make the light shimmer.
The interior was done by PTW, with the original concept done by the Buchan Group.

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There is a rather alluring mysterious ivy surrounded escalator heading down into the depths, but my impulse was to climb.

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A lot of the fashion retail has some pared-back, sophisticated design. I love the exposed services here.

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Simple candy stripes.

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The food court is up a couple of levels. It’s still quiet and being fitted out, but I expect that this will become a very popular space.

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Arty….

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Out the back, the bottom supermarket level connects through to a wonderful outdoor courtyard. This is also surrounded by food offerings and is filled with hip brazilian music. Again, I expect that this will become a great space.

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And finally we look up to be reminded just how freaking hip this building is.

180 Thomas St- a walk on the Highline

1 Sep

180 Thomas Street is a very nicely designed small office building.
-built diagonally opposite the new UTS Gehry building on the old goods line viaduct (our local version of the NY Highline).
-in a very dynamic part of the city fringe near Central and Chinatown and the university precinct.
-expressive facade with a glass external lift core.
-light filled entry lobby under expressed structural building trusses (supporting new build over existing
substation).

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Above- Architect’s (Bates Smart) rendering of completed project.

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Above- current view.

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Above- Architect’s (Bates Smart) rendering of completed project.

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Above- current view.

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Above- Architect’s (Bates Smart) rendering of the light filled entry lobby.

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Above- current view from street. Note the truss and the proximity to the Sydney High Line.

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Above- trusses

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Above- the steel trusses being fabricated in Chine.

 

180 Thomas Street Ultimo is a nine storey office building constructed above an existing substation. The project includes retail tenancies at ground level, outdoor eating areas fronting the local pedestrian network, and three levels of fitout including a wintergarden. The building is a steel framed construction with external glass lifts and an extensively glazed façade. The existing structure was originally designed to accept future development and six trusses weighing a total of over 120 tonne have been mounted on struts on the existing roof to support the new works.

Project:180 Thomas St, Sydney
Architect: Bates Smart
Builder- Enstruct

Erection of the steelwork for the 180 Thomas St Haymarket project has commenced. The first steelwork to be erected was the 6 transfer trusses at plantroom level that allow the transition of the office floor plate columns to suit the contemporary office floor plate layout of the new office building and provide the 9.5m cantilever on the western side of the building. Completion of the erection of the Level 1 steelwork will allow the Level 1 concrete floor plate to be placed with the erection of the upper levels of steelwork to follow.

Fabrication for the steelwork at the 180 Thomas St Haymarket project has commenced with erection of steelwork programmed to commence in December. The steelwork for this project is being fabricated in China.

Links

http://www.slattery.com.au/projects/180-thomas-street-sydney/#sthash.YMdodKzN.dpuf

 

August Construction update

1 Aug

There are half a dozen fantastic projects going up within half a mile of Central Station.

Here are some recent update pictures (changing rapidly…)

01. Central Park

That heliport still amazes me every time I walk past it. And the greenery growing on the walls. Talk about smoke and mirrors. However, it does work to set this development apart from the other boring stuff. And the site is superb too.

More images- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW15.htm

01A 01B 01C

02. 163 Castlereagh Street (ANZ Tower).

Up in mid-town, the new ANZ tower by Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp (FJMT) has turned out wonderfully. The good detailing and sense of design that FJMT usually display on their libraries (etc) is here employed to make some urbanely relaxed inner city spaces.

More images- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW01.htm

 

02A 02B 02C

03.  Construction of the new 14-storey faculty UTS ITE Building dramatically sheathed in angular aluminium on the corner of Broadway and Jones Street. A somewhat disturbingly modern (decon) facade (modern Brutalism..) facing the main entry to the city. This may turn out badly.

More images- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-023.htm

03A 03B 03C

04.  The UTS Dr Chau Chak Wing Building

Just down the road from the ITE Building is the new superstar-Gehry-designed Chau Chak Wing. The facade has not started to go on but it promises to be a good one. It is also sited on an old elevated disused railway corridor that promises to become a very interesting and dynamic part of Sydney.

More images- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-021.htm

 

04A

05. 180 Thomas Street, Haymarket. Bates Smart

Won through a City of Sydney Design Excellence Competition.
Very nice little office building, opposite the Gehry UTS building (on the old railway building. A conversion of a 10 year old plinth.

05A

 

05C

Above- a BS rendering of the completed project.

Broadway's role in city life on the rise

5 Dec

Kelsey Munro, Jen Rosenberg SMH December 3, 2011

The price of good design


IN A few years, an unloved and unlovely part of the city will have been transformed into ”a gallery of eminent architects”, with new buildings by three Pritzker Prize winners, a 6400-square-metre park and a power station.

Investments totalling $1.5 billion from the University of Technology, Sydney, along with the joint venture developing the former Carlton&United Breweries site near Central Station, are set to reshape the southern end of the city centre.

On Broadway’s south side, a 33-storey residential tower shrouded in elaborate vertical gardens is rising around a new landscaped park, remnant brewery buildings and a planned tri-generation power station to supply the new complex.


Terraced gardens at One Central Park. Artist’s impression.

A cantilevered heliostat at the top of the building will direct light into the complex and become a digital artwork at night.

One Central Park


One Central Park, Sydney. Artist’s impression.

”There’s no doubt it’s going to be a stunning transformation over the next five years,” Guy Pahor, of Frasers Property, said.

Frasers is developing the One Central Park site in a joint venture with Sekisui House. ”Broadway’s going to be transformed, not just by the nature and volume of the construction, but the quality – call it a gallery of eminent architects,” he said.

With Gehry, there are Jean Nouvel, Richard Johnson, Norman Foster and vertical-garden pioneer Patrick Blanc in the internationals.


Atelier Jean Nouvel, residential towers with the heliostat illuminated at night time. Central Park. Artist’s impression.

Australian firms include Tzannes Associates, Tonkin Zulaikha Greer, Denton Corker Marshall and Durbach Block Jaggers.

Gehry, Nouvel and Foster have won the Pritzker, architecture’s highest honour.

When the first stage of One Central Park is finished in late 2013, there will be about 1900 new apartments for 2500 residents and space for 5400 workers in offices and a four-storey mall.


Richard Johnson buildings, Cental Park. Artist’s impression.

The developer has worked to sway objectors angry at the height of the towers, holding several community forums, investing in a public art program and allowing local artists to work rent-free in heritage warehouses on the site.


Atelier Jean Nouvel, residential towers, Central Park. Artist’s impression.

UTS

For UTS, the development was as much about creating an education hub for the whole area as it was expanding its footprint, the vice-chancellor, Ross Milbourne, said.

”The exciting thing about this project is that it takes an area that has been quite rundown – it’s always been the poor cousin to the rest of Sydney – and it’s really reinventing itself to be a cultural and educational precinct.”

Across the road, the base of the 27-storey brutalist concrete UTS tower will be wrapped in an undulating glass facade, and construction starts in March on a new 14-storey faculty building dramatically sheathed in angular aluminium on the corner of Broadway and Jones Street.

Off Harris Street, the university is also building Australia’s first Frank Gehry building, with its distinctive crumpled facade and treehouse-like skeleton, which caused much controversy when plans were unveiled late last year.

UTS’s Dr Chau Chak Wing building, designed by Frank Gehry, his first Australian project. The 16,030-square-meter (172,545-square-foot) business school building at the University of Technology, Sydney, will have a “treehouse” design, incorporating a core yellow brick and crinkly glass structure, with “branches” spreading away from it, Gehry says.

Significantly, the site engages with the adjacent abandoned railway line and bridge and will feed into the pedestrian zone further up.

 

Professor Milbourne said the university had planned its growth to benefit students and the neighbourhood. ”We have a plan for student growth on our campus but part of it is to make it a better student experience, so more space for students … increasing student housing around this area and making it a safer environment,” he said.

The Broadway redesign links two other big redevelopments – Darling Harbour and Barangaroo – but has managed much of the latter’s controversy.

Professor Milbourne and the UTS deputy vice-chancellor (resources), Patrick Woods, attribute that to strong collaboration with the neighbours. These include the ABC, the Powerhouse Museum and TAFE.


Atelier Jean Nouvel, residential towers, Central Park. Artist’s impression.

David Riordan, director of TAFE NSW-Sydney Institute, said the relationship between the two institutions was very positive.

”This is going to be the hub of education in Australia and we believe that we’re here to meet those needs and that we’ll be a key player,” Mr Riordan said.

Copyright SMH

Mirvac Harold Park revealed

12 Oct

Mirvac has finally lodged the DA plans at Sydney Council for their multi-residential redevelopment of the former Harold Park Paceway site at Forest Lodge.

The above rendering shows the Harold Park site with the thus far designed Precinct One (Mirvac Design) and Precinct Two (SJB Architects). Site masterplanning by Hassell and site landscape design by Aspect Studio.

 

The Site

First, let’s look at the site.

The site is divided into six precincts (to be built in phases). Each of these is effectively a single building, with a shared excavated carpark and two to four towers, and with a deep soil zone in the middle (DA requirement). Precinct Six is to be sold to another developer for student/essential service housing (DA condition). Precinct 4A to the north of the site has not been fully resolved- its traffic will be directed on to Maxwell Street and local residents are concerned.

There is also a park site (5.8 hectares (14 acres)) against the cliff. This, along with the roads, is to be ceded back to the City. It also forms the overland flow path for floods (very important on this site).

There is also the old Rozelle Tram Depot. This is to be developed as 7000sm of retail. Unfortunately, the parking for this has been placed in front of the depot (it would have been too expensive to put it under the Depot as council has asked for in the master plan).

Above- plan (Aspect) for one of the “pocket parks”. This links the existing Crescent roadway with one of the new site roadways. It allows for a significant (about 4m) level change.

Above- Hassell masterplan massing model. Note the six story buildings on the Crescent, stepping back to 8 story within the site. Sydney Council was strict about imposing building setbacks (delaying the DAs).

Above- an example of an existing recent Mirvac development at Rhodes.

Above- the site, 1948.

Above- the site, today. Quite a few more trees.

Precincts One and Two

Now, the good stuff.

Precinct One

Above- Site plan for Precinct One (Mirvac Design). There are “terrace houses” at street level, with traditional flats above (typical accross site). Four towers around a deep soil courtyard zone in the middle.

Above- P1 facade elevations.

Above- Computer rendering of Precinct One showing the pop-out windows.

Above- note that the top two levels step further in. This is part of the DCP and was insisted on by council.

Above- P1 shown in context on the site model.

Precinct Two

Above- Detail of the pocket park between the two P2 buildings as designed by Aspect. This is intended to blend seemlessly into the surrounding landscape and optimistically shows tall trees planted in very shallow beds.

Above- The P2 plans and elevations by SJB Architects.

Above- A section through one of the P2 buildings showing its relationship to the adjacent “heritage” cliff and existing house. The concept was that the top datum of the new buildings was not to rise above the roofline of the existing Victorian homes.

The Tram Depot

Above- the Tram Depot on the site will be converted to 7000m2 retail (possibly sold on to a separate developer).  It has sat empty and derlict since the 1980s. Trams ceased operating out of there in the 1950s.

Above- the entry area today.

Above- as it was in the 1950s.

Above- the interior today. There are a number of badly vandalised trams in there, some of which will be retained and restored.

Above- the proposed exterior (image- Loop Creative).

Above- the proposed interior (image- Loop Creative). Possibly to be used as a large green grocers store and/or gym.

Synopsis

This development will have a huge impact on the area. However, as Sydney marches towards 5 million people it is better to concentrate populations near the city.

If it can be done as sensitively as the old Children’s Hospital site up the road (on Pyrmont Bridge Road) then it will be a winner. We will wait and see.

Update on Haymarket Metro Plaza

10 Aug

This cleverly resolved residential development in the Haymarket Special Area designed by WMK Watermark achieved City of Sydney DA approval in less than a year.

WMK Watermark won the City of Sydney sanctioned Design Competition for this undeveloped site run by the Developer, Metroland.

 

Located in the heart of Haymarket, the $80M Metro Plaza mixed use development captures the area’s social and architectural diversity. Through design excellence this innovative design was awarded 10% bonus floor area and 10% bonus height by the City of Sydney.

 

WMK Watermark’s design incorporates varied architectural elements, with each of the two 14 storey towers expressing their own personality, while ingenious planning maximises sun access and views. The treatment of the remnant heritage wall enhances the urban scale of the Ultimo Rd/Quay St corner and the podium design incorporates a diagonal pedestrian link.

 

Quick facts:

•218 apartments

•9,000sqm of retail

•Tri-generation electricity

•33% greater sun access than SEPP65

•30% greater natural ventilation than SEPP65

•Telescoping of plant and car park ventilation

•5 Star Nabers and Greenstar Residential and Retail design

•Meets City of Sydney 2030 energy targets