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Central Park West? New development for Parramatta downtown.

18 Dec

Here are pictures of the winning scheme for the new two 53-storey office towers, designed by Sydney firm Johnson Pilton Walker, will be built as part of the Parramatta Square redevelopment in the CBD.

I think that they look hugely like the Central Park development in the city at Broadway.

131217-PARRA-01

The buildings feature a sky terrace on the 25th floor and a sky lobby on the 27th floor which jut out from the tower, offering sweeping views to the Sydney CBD and across the west towards the Blue Mountains.

131217-PARRA-02 131217-PARRA-03 131217-PARRA-04

 

When constructed, the commercial towers will add up to 140,000 square metres of office space to the Parramatta CBD and function as two of the key centrepieces of the three-hectare Parramatta Square site in the heart of the CBD.
The original 4 short-lited from the competition (chosen from a field of 73 designs):

01. Mario Cucinella Architects’ offering for Parramatta Square Stages 5 & 6

131217-PARRA-COMP-01

02. Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp’s design concept

131217-PARRA-COMP-02

03. Johnson Pilton Walker’s design concept

131217-PARRA-COMP-03

04. Bates Smart’s design concept

131217-PARRA-COMP-04

180 Thomas St- a walk on the Highline

1 Sep

180 Thomas Street is a very nicely designed small office building.
-built diagonally opposite the new UTS Gehry building on the old goods line viaduct (our local version of the NY Highline).
-in a very dynamic part of the city fringe near Central and Chinatown and the university precinct.
-expressive facade with a glass external lift core.
-light filled entry lobby under expressed structural building trusses (supporting new build over existing
substation).

180T-01

Above- Architect’s (Bates Smart) rendering of completed project.

180T-02

Above- current view.

180T-03

Above- Architect’s (Bates Smart) rendering of completed project.

180T-04

Above- current view.

180T-05

Above- Architect’s (Bates Smart) rendering of the light filled entry lobby.

180T-06

Above- current view from street. Note the truss and the proximity to the Sydney High Line.

180T-07

Above- trusses

180T-08

 

Above- the steel trusses being fabricated in Chine.

 

180 Thomas Street Ultimo is a nine storey office building constructed above an existing substation. The project includes retail tenancies at ground level, outdoor eating areas fronting the local pedestrian network, and three levels of fitout including a wintergarden. The building is a steel framed construction with external glass lifts and an extensively glazed façade. The existing structure was originally designed to accept future development and six trusses weighing a total of over 120 tonne have been mounted on struts on the existing roof to support the new works.

Project:180 Thomas St, Sydney
Architect: Bates Smart
Builder- Enstruct

Erection of the steelwork for the 180 Thomas St Haymarket project has commenced. The first steelwork to be erected was the 6 transfer trusses at plantroom level that allow the transition of the office floor plate columns to suit the contemporary office floor plate layout of the new office building and provide the 9.5m cantilever on the western side of the building. Completion of the erection of the Level 1 steelwork will allow the Level 1 concrete floor plate to be placed with the erection of the upper levels of steelwork to follow.

Fabrication for the steelwork at the 180 Thomas St Haymarket project has commenced with erection of steelwork programmed to commence in December. The steelwork for this project is being fabricated in China.

Links

http://www.slattery.com.au/projects/180-thomas-street-sydney/#sthash.YMdodKzN.dpuf

 

Barangaroo plans reveal nation's largest office building

17 Nov

Kelsey Munro SMH November 17, 2011.

THERE may be taller buildings in Australia, but with its vast footprint, the 49-storey C3 tower at Barangaroo is likely to be the country’s largest office building in terms of floorspace.

Developer Lend Lease’s detailed plans for the second and third major commercial towers at Barangaroo were placed on exhibition by the Department of Planning yesterday, providing the most accurate glimpse yet of the future for the $6 billion urban renewal project.

At 205 metres tall with 115,291 square metres of floorspace, the northernmost commercial tower, C3, will be the tallest building at Barangaroo; but there will still be eight taller buildings in Sydney including the Citigroup and Chifley buildings.


C5, the southern tower, will be 39 storeys. Modified plans for the 42-storey C4 commercial tower standing between the two were lodged earlier this month.

Designed by architects Rogers Stirk Harbour & Partners, the towers have large floorplates, curved contours and vividly coloured vertical shading panels on the facade designed to cut air conditioning requirements by up to 30 per cent.

Each tower will have fewer than 200 car spaces; with a total of 1200 bicycle spaces across the three towers as part of plans to minimise car trips and promote alternative transport.

The childcare centre, which was deleted from C4 plans, has been restored in C3, while the planned supermarket in the commercial precinct has been downsized to a ”fresh food market in the podium of C5”, a Lend Lease spokesman said.

C3

A supermarket is likely to be part of the proposed residential towers to be built north of the commercial precinct, the spokesman said.

When complete, the three towers will provide almost 300,000 square metres of new office space in Sydney to house 24,000 workers; and 15,000 square metres of new retail floorspace at ground level.

Planning documents also proposed the use of ”responsive” digital landmarks beamed on to walls and building facades to help pedestrians navigate the new precinct. Completion of the three buildings, once approved, is scheduled for 2016.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/barangaroo-plans-reveal-nations-largest-office-building-20111116-1nj3k.html#ixzz1e04SEwlQ

1 Bligh St: Clayton Utz's new energy-efficient Sydney home

18 May

Julie Levis, Mondaq Business Briefing, May 2, 2011
There’s a greater awareness that a move into energy-efficient buildings can neatly combine several interests of a business – the financial, the human, and the community.

As of winter 2011, Clayton Utz will have a new home in Sydney in 1 Bligh St. As it is designed to achieve a 5 Star NABERS Energy rating and has been awarded a 6 Star Green Star Office Design v2 Certified rating, the first such high-rise in Sydney, we think this is a move which will do exactly that.

GREENING UP: One of four native Australian Banksia trees was hoisted by crane to an outdoor terrace at the nearly completed 1 Bligh Street building in Sydney’s central business district Monday. It is the first Sydney building to be awarded a six-star Green Star environmental rating score. (Angela Brkic/European Pressphoto Agency).

The green features of 1 Bligh Street

1 Bligh Street is built from sustainable construction materials:

90% of the steel used comprises more than 50% recycled content the use of green concrete has meant that nearly 6,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide have not been released into the atmosphere; 80% of the parts usually made from PVC have been replaced with non-PVC materials; and over 90% of the construction waste has been recycled.

Minimising the energy consumption through a double glass façade

For the first time on a high-rise building in Australia, 1 Bligh Street will have a double glass façade – a skin that not only lets in soft natural light, but also minimises the building’s energy consumption.

It does this by stopping direct sunlight from hitting the internal glass. Between the inner and outer windows, computer-controlled sun shades track the sun and automatically adjust themselves. Air is also drawn in through natural convection from lower vents, which further cools down the façade.

A better way to generate electricity

1 Bligh St uses an innovative tri-generation system. Gas and solar energy will generate cooling, heating and electricity, which could reduce our dependence on the electricity grid by up to 25%.

On top of the building, 500 square metres of roof-mounted solar panels will capture solar energy to directly power an absorption chiller to drive the cooling systems, an advanced hybrid of VAV and chilled beam air conditioning technology.

… and to save water

The blackwater recycling technology uses waste water mined from nearby sewer mains and the base building itself, and treats it to a standard allowing it be used in toilets, cooling towers, and plant irrigation.

This means that around 90% of the water demand will come from recycled water, saving one Olympic size swimming pool of water every two weeks.

The Renaissance wonders of Sydney

2 Apr

Sydney is actually home to a large amount of Renaissance-inspired architecture.

01- Image- Palazzo Strozzi, Florence.
Real Renaissance palazzo in Florence- the source of so much Western architecture.
Link- http://www.italian-architecture.info/FL/FL-005.htm

From approximately 1910 to 1940, the dominant style for Sydney commercial architecture was that of the commercial pallazo.

02- Image- Union Club (1883- 87, demolished).
Based on Barry’s great Reform Club in London, Renaissance language used here to denote dependability and connection with high culture.
Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/GON/GON14.htm

This was partly due to the conservative nature of Australian architecture, and partly due to the height limit set (150 ft until 1961) after the scandalously gigantic Culwulla Chambers.


03- Image- Culwulla Chambers, Warehouse style.
The more radical but domestic style of Federation Freestyle. Decidedly unsophisticated.
Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd4-014.htm

Above- the hulking mass of Culwulla Chambers shocked Sydneysiders. Anything this high was banned until 1961.

Up until 1910, high buildings in Sydney has been based on either Victorian of Federation/Queen Anne/Warehouse style. This style was, however, somewhat pedestrian for the great commercial buildings that were growing like mushrooms during the 1920s. A more impressive style was needed.

04- Image- University Club (1896- 1900), New York, by McKim, Mend & White.
Also based on the Reform.
Link- http://www.nyc-architecture.com/MID/MID048.htm

05- Image- The Goelet Building (1886-87), New York, by McKim, Mead & White.
The proportions of the palazzo suddenly spring to life on a city scale.
Link- http://www.nyc-architecture.com/CHE/CHE027-GoeletBuilding.htm

06- Image- The Flatiron Building (1903), by D H Burnham & Co.
A massive Renaissance palazzo complete with well defined base, shaft and capitol.
Link- http://www.nyc-architecture.com/GRP/GRP024.htm

In New York, McKim, Mead and White had successfully based a high-rise on a Renaissance pallazo. This was a logical thing to do, as small-scale mansions and banks had been doing this consistently through the nineteenth century. The beauty about the commercial Renaissance pallazo style was that, as the building had a well developed base and capitol, the “shaft” could be as long as required without upsetting the proportions of the building.
As this style best suited medium sized buildings without setbacks, it endured far longer in Sydney than elsewhere.

07- Image- Former Daily Telegraph Building (1912-16), King & Castlereagh Streets, Sydney, by Robertson & Marks. 155 KING STREET SYDNEY, The Trust Building.
This building, as with the Herald building below, is a superb civic jesture. As a piece of architecture it exclaims confidence in Sydney and its place in the world.
Interestingly, the Daily Telegraph was designed to house all of the newspaper’s functions, with the printing presses located in the basement and sub-basement. The greater part of the ground floor was given over to large, high, public space – the Advertising Hall – with offices on two levels grouped around it. Above it there was a complicated arrangement of low storeys, double-height storeys and mezzanines accommodating paper storage, stereo room and composing room. On the fourth floor, high-ceilinged spaces were provided for the board room, library and editorial staff, with five storeys of conventional office space above. While hardly satisfying Sullivan’s dictum about form following function, the Daily Telegraph’s facades loosely acknowledged the existence of the differing activities going on behind them, especially the bi-partite treatment of the building’s base.
Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd4-049.htm

08- Image- The former Sydney Morning Herald Building.  Quite superb.
Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd4-056.htm

09- Image- Commonwealth Bank (1913-14), Martin Place & Pitt St. Sydney, by John Fitzpatrick.
The very model of civilised dependability. The “money-box building”.
Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd5-04.htm

10- Image- Former Manchester Unity Oddfellows’ Building (1921-23), Elizabeth Street, by John P Tate & Young. Sydney.
Interesting building this. The Oddfellows were a quasi- secret society, whose good deeds included life insurance policies for the poor.
Interesting use of eastern temple language, especially as it is next to the Great Synagogue.
Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd4-052.htm

11- Image- Former Farmer’s Store (c 1930). George & Market Streets, by Robertson & Marks. Sydney.
Shows how department stores were viewed as important prestigious social institutions (as they were, with the mail order component tying the country together).
Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd4-055.htm

12- Image- Gowings Bros (1912, 1929) 318 George & Market Streets, by Robertson & Marks and C H McKellar. Sydney.
Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd4-040.htm

13- Image- Former Shell House (1938), Carrington & Margaret Streets, by Spain & Cosh. Sydney.
This terracotta-clad Renaissance palazzo is very late, about the last example in Sydney. It has a strong Art-Deco influence, but is still strongly bound to the Renaissance massing conventions.
The Rural Bank of Martin Place (demolished) of 1939 was strongly Art Deco. Perhaps Shell saw this as too radical.
Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd4-048.htm

More info- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/GALL/GALL-PALAZZO.htm

Westfield's 85 Castlereagh emerges from the cocoon

16 Mar

The iconic 85 Castlereagh Street building by Westfields and John Wardle Architects of Melbourne is slowly emerging, chrysalis-like, on to the Sydney skyline.


Much anticipated by its designers, and its new principal tenant JPMorgan, this glassy turd is proving difficult to see. Pertinently, design renderings by the architects always showed this Jetsonesque tower viewed from the air. There are few points on the ground to study its drama.


The 6 Greenstar tower was briefly put on hold during the GFC. It shares with the retail below a blackwater plant (basement) and a cogeneration facility (using gas to generate electricity, utilising the waste heat to power the chillers- somewhat technical!) housed on the roof of the ASIC-occupied 100 Market Street next door.


The Lowys (owners of Westfield’s) intend to occupy the top few floors and place their workers in the fifficult=to-rent lower floors of 100 Market Street (to “live above the shop”, so to say). The old Westfield tower on William Street will be presumably vacated.

Barangaroo C4 is shrinking – city tower is cut down to size

7 Mar

Vikki Campion From: The Daily Telegraph February 11, 2011

BARANGAROO is shrinking.

Critics slammed the latest office tower to hit NSW Planning desks, a 42-storey goliath, for being too broad and bulky.

Architects had a second go at it yesterday, slimming the $1 billion building by 6m.

Developers have slashed back the original plans, paring back the pier length from 150m to 85m, the hotel height from 213m to 159m, and the number of commercial towers from four to three.

British architect Lord Richard Rogers, famous for designing the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Lloyd’s building in London and the new Tower 3 at the reconstructed World Trade Centre, drew the inside-out building in a “contemporary architectural style” that makes it appear transparent.

The lifts have been cut from nine to eight, projecting bays have been replaced with recessed bays, and its edges have been “tapered and curved” in a bid to shorten its appearance.

Lend Lease’s group head of development David Hutton said the changes came after 20 submissions from the public.

“We have responded to Sydney City Council’s comments and introduced refinements that improve the scale and appearance of the building and we have produced an even better result,” he said.

At 176.5m tall, the building will have 88,582 sq m of commercial floor space. It is due to be completed in 2014.

Source- http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw-act/barangaroo-is-shrinking-city-tower-is-cut-down-to-size/story-e6freuzi-1226003997950