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August Construction update

1 Aug

There are half a dozen fantastic projects going up within half a mile of Central Station.

Here are some recent update pictures (changing rapidly…)

01. Central Park

That heliport still amazes me every time I walk past it. And the greenery growing on the walls. Talk about smoke and mirrors. However, it does work to set this development apart from the other boring stuff. And the site is superb too.

More images- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW15.htm

01A 01B 01C

02. 163 Castlereagh Street (ANZ Tower).

Up in mid-town, the new ANZ tower by Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp (FJMT) has turned out wonderfully. The good detailing and sense of design that FJMT usually display on their libraries (etc) is here employed to make some urbanely relaxed inner city spaces.

More images- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW01.htm

 

02A 02B 02C

03.  Construction of the new 14-storey faculty UTS ITE Building dramatically sheathed in angular aluminium on the corner of Broadway and Jones Street. A somewhat disturbingly modern (decon) facade (modern Brutalism..) facing the main entry to the city. This may turn out badly.

More images- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-023.htm

03A 03B 03C

04.  The UTS Dr Chau Chak Wing Building

Just down the road from the ITE Building is the new superstar-Gehry-designed Chau Chak Wing. The facade has not started to go on but it promises to be a good one. It is also sited on an old elevated disused railway corridor that promises to become a very interesting and dynamic part of Sydney.

More images- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-021.htm

 

04A

05. 180 Thomas Street, Haymarket. Bates Smart

Won through a City of Sydney Design Excellence Competition.
Very nice little office building, opposite the Gehry UTS building (on the old railway building. A conversion of a 10 year old plinth.

05A

 

05C

Above- a BS rendering of the completed project.

Sydney rebranded…

27 Jun

Sydney’s landmark tower has been rebranded. The iconic Sydney Tower has been labelled with not one but two Westfield signs measuring 20m long and six metres high.

The giant logos were winched into place by two helicopters Sunday morning during an orchestrated operation that was several months in planning.

The Westfield sign marks the recently re-opened iconic Westfield Sydney shopping centre which lies beneath.

 

While AMP managed the Centrepoint shopping centre, the tower was officially referred to as “AMP Tower”. After Westfield Group took over ownership of Centrepoint in December 2001, the tower reverted to its original name of Sydney Tower.

Construction of the office building commenced in 1970, and tower construction began in 1975. Public access to the tower, at the time the fourth tallest building in the world, began in September 1981. The total cost of construction was A$ 36 million.

Prior to construction of the tower, the height limit in Sydney had been set at 279 m, to allow for safe overflights by flying boats, an aircraft type that had been obsolescent for almost two decades.

There are three main sections of the tower open to public access. One is the observation deck at 250 metres above ground level with a fully-enclosed viewing platform featuring 360 degree views of the city and surrounds. This floor also features a small gift shop, a readout displaying data on the conditions of the tower (wind speed, direction and sway amplitude). The Sydney Tower Skywalk platform at 268 metres above ground level has an open-air viewing platform only accessible as part of planned and booked tours.

There are also revolving restaurants, one à la carte and one buffet. The buffet restaurant was recently (2006) renovated. It seats 220 people, and serves 185,000 customers annually, of which 50,000 are international visitors, mostly from Asia.

Links
http://travel.msn.co.nz/glance/174368/sydney-tower-sign-changeover.glance
http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd4-042.htm

1 Bligh St: Clayton Utz's new energy-efficient Sydney home

18 May

Julie Levis, Mondaq Business Briefing, May 2, 2011
There’s a greater awareness that a move into energy-efficient buildings can neatly combine several interests of a business – the financial, the human, and the community.

As of winter 2011, Clayton Utz will have a new home in Sydney in 1 Bligh St. As it is designed to achieve a 5 Star NABERS Energy rating and has been awarded a 6 Star Green Star Office Design v2 Certified rating, the first such high-rise in Sydney, we think this is a move which will do exactly that.

GREENING UP: One of four native Australian Banksia trees was hoisted by crane to an outdoor terrace at the nearly completed 1 Bligh Street building in Sydney’s central business district Monday. It is the first Sydney building to be awarded a six-star Green Star environmental rating score. (Angela Brkic/European Pressphoto Agency).

The green features of 1 Bligh Street

1 Bligh Street is built from sustainable construction materials:

90% of the steel used comprises more than 50% recycled content the use of green concrete has meant that nearly 6,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide have not been released into the atmosphere; 80% of the parts usually made from PVC have been replaced with non-PVC materials; and over 90% of the construction waste has been recycled.

Minimising the energy consumption through a double glass façade

For the first time on a high-rise building in Australia, 1 Bligh Street will have a double glass façade – a skin that not only lets in soft natural light, but also minimises the building’s energy consumption.

It does this by stopping direct sunlight from hitting the internal glass. Between the inner and outer windows, computer-controlled sun shades track the sun and automatically adjust themselves. Air is also drawn in through natural convection from lower vents, which further cools down the façade.

A better way to generate electricity

1 Bligh St uses an innovative tri-generation system. Gas and solar energy will generate cooling, heating and electricity, which could reduce our dependence on the electricity grid by up to 25%.

On top of the building, 500 square metres of roof-mounted solar panels will capture solar energy to directly power an absorption chiller to drive the cooling systems, an advanced hybrid of VAV and chilled beam air conditioning technology.

… and to save water

The blackwater recycling technology uses waste water mined from nearby sewer mains and the base building itself, and treats it to a standard allowing it be used in toilets, cooling towers, and plant irrigation.

This means that around 90% of the water demand will come from recycled water, saving one Olympic size swimming pool of water every two weeks.

SYDNEY’S FIRST SKYSCRAPER

17 Apr

Sydney’s skyline changed in 1912 when its tallest building to date, Culwulla Chambers, was built on the corner of King Street and Castlereagh Street to a height of 50 metres (165 feet). Designed by Spain, Cosh and Minnett the building consisted of 14 floors and cost a record £100,000 to build.

Culwulla Chambers was hailed a skyscraper by the press, however in being a masonry construction rather than a metal frame, it was simply a tall building.

The construction of Culwulla Chambers resulted in much controversy. People feared Sydney would develop a ‘New York style’ skyline and the building itself was considered a potential fire hazard, as fire ladders could not reach its maximum height.

The hulking mass over King Street circa 1914.

The same view today. Interestingly, the streetscape is still quite recognizable. The Culwulla Chambers are not so threatening as before.

As a result of this concern a subsequent amendment was made to building regulations prohibiting the erection of buildings taller than 45 metres (150 feet). This regulation remained in force until the AMP building was constructed at Circular Quay in 1961.

Sydney’s tallest buildings through history

01. St James Spire 1820, 52m
02. Sydney Town Hall 1868 Clock tower 57 m 187 ft
03. JOHN KEEP warehouse, 1883, 30 metres (100 feet) 7 floors
04. Australia Hotel 1889 44m, (Finial 62m) 9 floors
05. Societe Generale House 1896 42 metres 7 floors
06. Culwulla Chambers 1912 50 metres (165 feet) 14 floors
07. T&G Tower 1930 roof-46m, top of spire-71m demolished 1975
08. AWA Building (Wireless House) 1939 112 m 367 ft
09. AMP 1961 106m
10. State Office Block 1965, 128m
11. Australia Square Tower – 170m – 50 floors 1967
12. AMP Centre – 188m – 45 floors 1976
13. MLC Centre – 228m (Antenna 244m) 67 floors 1977
14. Sydney Tower Roof 275m (Antenna 309m) 19 floors 1981

Credit- with thanks to Culwulla

T&G Tower 1930

SYDNEY'S FIRST SKYSCRAPER

17 Apr

Sydney’s skyline changed in 1912 when its tallest building to date, Culwulla Chambers, was built on the corner of King Street and Castlereagh Street to a height of 50 metres (165 feet). Designed by Spain, Cosh and Minnett the building consisted of 14 floors and cost a record £100,000 to build.

Culwulla Chambers was hailed a skyscraper by the press, however in being a masonry construction rather than a metal frame, it was simply a tall building.

The construction of Culwulla Chambers resulted in much controversy. People feared Sydney would develop a ‘New York style’ skyline and the building itself was considered a potential fire hazard, as fire ladders could not reach its maximum height.

The hulking mass over King Street circa 1914.

The same view today. Interestingly, the streetscape is still quite recognizable. The Culwulla Chambers are not so threatening as before.

As a result of this concern a subsequent amendment was made to building regulations prohibiting the erection of buildings taller than 45 metres (150 feet). This regulation remained in force until the AMP building was constructed at Circular Quay in 1961.

Sydney’s tallest buildings through history

01. St James Spire 1820, 52m
02. Sydney Town Hall 1868 Clock tower 57 m 187 ft
03. JOHN KEEP warehouse, 1883, 30 metres (100 feet) 7 floors
04. Australia Hotel 1889 44m, (Finial 62m) 9 floors
05. Societe Generale House 1896 42 metres 7 floors
06. Culwulla Chambers 1912 50 metres (165 feet) 14 floors
07. T&G Tower 1930 roof-46m, top of spire-71m demolished 1975
08. AWA Building (Wireless House) 1939 112 m 367 ft
09. AMP 1961 106m
10. State Office Block 1965, 128m
11. Australia Square Tower – 170m – 50 floors 1967
12. AMP Centre – 188m – 45 floors 1976
13. MLC Centre – 228m (Antenna 244m) 67 floors 1977
14. Sydney Tower Roof 275m (Antenna 309m) 19 floors 1981

T&G Tower 1930

Westfield's 85 Castlereagh emerges from the cocoon

16 Mar

The iconic 85 Castlereagh Street building by Westfields and John Wardle Architects of Melbourne is slowly emerging, chrysalis-like, on to the Sydney skyline.


Much anticipated by its designers, and its new principal tenant JPMorgan, this glassy turd is proving difficult to see. Pertinently, design renderings by the architects always showed this Jetsonesque tower viewed from the air. There are few points on the ground to study its drama.


The 6 Greenstar tower was briefly put on hold during the GFC. It shares with the retail below a blackwater plant (basement) and a cogeneration facility (using gas to generate electricity, utilising the waste heat to power the chillers- somewhat technical!) housed on the roof of the ASIC-occupied 100 Market Street next door.


The Lowys (owners of Westfield’s) intend to occupy the top few floors and place their workers in the fifficult=to-rent lower floors of 100 Market Street (to “live above the shop”, so to say). The old Westfield tower on William Street will be presumably vacated.

Residents buy off-plan to tower above Chatswood

9 Feb

9 Feb 11 by Kat Adamski

CHATSWOOD’S newest apartment blocks will soar 260m above sea level – the North Shore’s highest.  The $450 million Chatswood Interchange project, which went into receivership in 2008, is back on track after it was revived by the Sydney’s Galileo Group.

The highest of the three towers would be 140m, which would make it the North Shore’s tallest.

Liquidator CRI Chatswood sold the rights to build the three towers to Galileo, which teamed with ISPT, one of Australia’s largest unlisted property funds, to buy the site late last year.

The consortium is relying on off-the-plan apartment sales so construction can start on two of the towers as early as June.

They will be built above Chatswood station.

In the past, Willoughby Council general manager Nick Tobin has been critical of the site, saying the State Government had approved the residential towers without contributing to the public services and amenities that 1000 residents would need.

Metro View (31 storeys) and Metro Spire (42 storeys) will be built on the north-eastern edge of the already completed retail podium, which is unleased.

Together they will provide 292 apartments, with prices from $488,000 for one-bedroom units to a penthouse for $1.725 million.  The third and highest tower, Metro Grand, at 56 storeys, would follow on the western side of the site with 261 apartments.

Willoughby Mayor Pat Reilly said he was disappointed that the residential component was progressing before the retail podium negotiations were finalised.  “(The overall development) was approved by the State Government beyond our control, but we believe the retail component should be the main concern,” Cr Reilly said.

“While council has advocated for an office building, the location of the three towers in the heart of the Chatswood CBD has assisted us in meeting the government’s increased dwelling requirements.”

A display suite at 391 Victoria Ave is open 10am to 4pm daily. Phone 1800 839 883 or see metroresidences.com.au.

Source- http://north-shore-times.whereilive.com.au/news/story/residents-buy-off-plan-to-tower-above-chatswood/

Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW03.htm