New Flats Galore!

5 Aug

2014 is turning out to be a huge year for multi-residential construction. A few major architecture companies largely dominate this scene, with a few rather interesting creative developers too. Below are the main ones going up this year.

South

10 Rosebery: 88 apartments on Botany Road.
Asper, Roseberry www.asperroseberry.com.au
Architect: Turner Associates

  

15 Botany: Park Grove. 170 apartments.
Architect: Krikis Tayler

 

16 Brighton: Longbeach apartments 344 Bay Street Brighton Le Sands
Architect: Tony Owen Partners (wow…!)

   

30 564 Princes Highway, Rockdale.
Architect: a+ design group aplusdg.com

31 Wolli Creek: three new buildings at Australand’s Discovery Point and the third stage of Southbank by Winten.
Southbank, Wolli Creek www.southbankwollicreek.com.au  http://www.winten.com.au/
Architect:

  

32 Woolooware: 600 apartments at the Bluestone new community Woolooware Bay. $300 million
Woolooware Bay Town Centre on the Cronulla Sutherland Leagues Club site, Shark Park.
Architect: Retail: Scott Carver and landscape architects Aspect Studios. Residential: Turner Associates.
220 apartments within three separate buildings ranging from a height of seven to twelve storeys.
http://www.jbaplanning.com.au/news/news-details/approved-major-new-developments-at-shark-park

     

42
Moss Wood Residence, 21-35 Princes Highway, Kogarah
84 Residential Apartments rising 10 storeys
Developer: Deicorp D&C

 

49.
East at Erkohttp://www.eastaterko.com.au/
41 apartments
Architect: SJB Architects (looks very similar to what they did at Harold Park (that turned out very well)).

   

50.
Breeze development, Little Bay
52 apartments
Architect:

————

North

11 Beecroft: 170 apartments.

18 Panorama Crows Nest: Willoughby Road.
Architect: JPRA for Barana Group
http://www.panoramacrowsnest.com.au/

 

20 Dee Why Grand: 150 apartments.
Architect: Fitzgerald Bennett
and 2-10 Mooramba Road Dee Why
 

24 Lane Cove: second stage of the DHA development of 170 homes. Arcadia. ‘Tree house’ apartments.
Crimson Hill, Lindfield. Defence Housing Australia (old UTS Ku-ring-gai Campus)
Architect: Architectus

  

26 Meadowbank, Shepherds Bay. 2000 new apartments. 2-8 Rothesay Avenue Meadowbank
Holdmark Property Group. 15-storey landmark tower with others stepped between 4 and 12 levels
Architect: Robertson + Marks

  

29 9 Atchison St ST LEONARDS: 60 apartments.
Architect: a+ design group aplusdg.com

 

38.
Alcove, Killeaton Street, St Ives.
300 apartments across six buildings. Meriton.

40,
Pymble Grand.
Architect: Mackenzie Architects
Developer: Modern Construction & Development.
Two five-storey blocks with 50 units.

48
The Sydney, at Macquarie Park Village near North Ryde
152 apartments offered in 23-level tower
Architect: Allen Jack + Cottier

53. Plaza 88, Archer Street, Chatswood. 212 serviced apartments
Architect: Marchese Partners (auspicious numbering…)

63.
Aurora, 3-9 Finlayson Street, Lane Cove.
Architect: designed by Angelo Candalepas and Associates and developed by MV Projects.

 

64.
Emerant Lane. 85 apartments. Lane Cove.
Architect: developed by SAKKARA with designs by dKO Architects.

65.
The Botanic, Finlayson Street, Lane Cove.
Architect: SJB Interiors, Mijollo Architects, Greenbush Group, Icon Co.

————

West

12. Altitude Apartments, 330 Church Street, Parramatta
Architect: Tony Caro for Meriton
53 levels. Meriton (wow…)

  

27 Parramatta: 450 apartments at Riverside.
Crown Group’s $309 million residential tower, V by Crown, twin commercial towers by Johnson Pilton Walker,
Architect: Johnson Pilton Walker Architects
Developer: Crown Group
$250 million development

36.
290-292 Parramatta Road, Auburn
1000 apartments
Architect: Cox Architecture

37.
Flemington markets
Up to 10,000 apartments in 30 storey towers.
Architect: Group GSA

41
Little Saigon Plaza, 462 Chapel Road, Bankstown
Retail and commercial
Developer: Deicorp D&C

 

43
Broadway Plaza, The Broadway Punchbowl
10,000m2 of Retail and 152 Residential Apartments within 7 buildings rising 5 storeys
Developer: Deicorp D&C

54. Centric Parnell Street, Strathfield
Architect: SJB Architects
http://www.centricstrathfield.com.au/Architecture/

55.
Skypoint Towers,46-50 John St Lidcombe
9 storey. Completion 2016

56.
7 Deane Street BURWOOD
97 units plus 3 retail shops. Opposite Burwood Train Station.

57.
1-17 Elsie Street Burwood

  

61.
Aspire Tower
Architect: Grimshaw
160-182 Church Street, Parramatta,
336 m (1,102 ft), 90 stories.

————

East

13 Bondi: 200-plus apartments from Mirvac on Ocean Street.
Architect: Mirvac Design, TBA designer.

14 Bondi Junction: 129 new apartments from Leighton Properties. 20-level AQUA
Architect: kann finch group in collaboration with DC8 Studio. Koichi Takada Architects interiors.

————

Inner West

 

17 Canterbury: 170 apartments on Charles Street.
Habitat, Canterbury www.habitatcanterbury.com.au
Architect: Turner & Associates

  

21 Erskineville: a new development of 200 apartments, Eve by Fridcorp.
Eve by Fridcorpwww.evebyfridcorp.com.au
Address: Corner of Eve and McDonald Streets Erskineville.
Architect: DKO

 

22 Five Dock: 155-159 Parramatta Road, Five Dock
1300 apartments
Architect:  Allan, Jack and Cottier for Crown International Holdings and Drivas Property Group

      

23 Forest Lodge: 300 more lots in new stages of Mirvac’s Harold Park development.
Altivolo, Harold Park (Precinct 4)
Architect: Developer: Mirvac Design

 

25
DeiCota Tower, Redfern St Redfern
Developer: Deicorp Design & Construct

 

34. Earlwood
Elysium Apartments
Address: 17-25 William Street, Earlwood.

 

35.
The Flour Mill at Summer Hill, where 300 apartments are planned
Architect: Hassell

 

44
Revolution Apartments, Illawarra Road, Marrickville
180 Residential Units spread over 4 buildings
Developer: Deicorp D&C

 

45
Urba, Gibbons St Redfern
19 Storey mixed use Developments. Retail, commercial and 135 Apartments.
Developer: Deicorp D&C

 

46
Alpha Apartments, 20 McGill Street, Lewisham.
68 Residential Apartments rising 6 storeys
Developer: Deicorp D&C

 

58.
22 George Street Leichhardt (former Kolotex Glo factory)
rezoned from industrial to B4 mixed use
244 apartments, with 1,126 square metres of mixed-use space, with three street frontages.
Architect: SJB Architects
Greenland paid $47.1 million for the site.

 

59.
Homebush’s Town Centre
The Crescent, near Homebush station
12 storey block on the site of the sub branch of the RSL

 

60.
2A Brown Street Ashfield
Architect: Olsson and Assoc.
Two 8 storey mixed use buildings. 120 apartments plus retail.

City

 

 

19 Darling Harbour: 1400 apartments
First stage:
Darling Sqwww.darlingsq.com
Architect: Denton Corker Marshall (DCM) for Lend Lease
Darling Square, The Boulevard, Sydney

 

 

 

33. City
Greenland Centre www.greenlandcentre.com.au  (old Sydney Water Headquarters, 1965)
Address: 115 Bathhurst Street Sydney. 236 metres.
Architect: bligh voller nield Donovan Hill and WoodsBagot
two-bedroom apartments (76 -88sqm) from $1,325,000 and three beds (105-143sqm) from $2.2 million.
1930s building next door to become a hotel
Architect: Peddle Thorp Architects and Laboratory for Visionary Architecture (LAVA)

 

 

 

51.
Harbour Mill Apartments, Pyrmont.
http://www.hessiandesign.com/grimshaw/
Architect: Grimshaw. Developer- Ceerose.

 

 

52. The Quay. $280 million. http://www.wmkarchitecture.com/
Quay Street, Haymarket
Architect: WMK

62
Barangaroo Apartments
Lend Lease. 159 apartments
Architect: Richard Francis-Jones of Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp and Andrew Andersons of Peddle Thorp Architects
two apartment complexes will become the first in the Barangaroo South region

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2014 is a huge year for Sydney glitz and glam.

16 May

2014 is a huge year for Sydney glitz and glam.

A number of old icons are being razed for new icons. Each one of the below buildings are world class.

Under construction

140507-C01-001

Barangaroo
International Towers | 49st, 43st, 39st / 217m, 178m, 168m /
Architect- various

The fantastic Barangaroo is emerging from the primordial soup of east Darling Harbour.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW04.htm

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20 Martin Place
Architect- Crone Partners in collaboration with James Carpenter Design Associates (NY).

A dazzling glass Miesien box to replace the seventies dazzling glass Miesien box. The main part of the renaissance of Martin Place. The architects have moved the circulation cores out of the main floor area. The old building was reduced to a fantastic steel skeleton.
Crones are so hot right now!
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd5-16.htm

140507-C03-020

5 Martin Place
Architect- Johnson Pilton Walker with Tanner Kibble Denton Architects.

A rather sympathetic and sophisticated approach to the sandstone canyon of Martin Place. Compliments the Commonwealth Bank money-box building next door.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd5-04.htm

140507-C04-001

Macquarie Martin Place headquarters
48 Martin Place.
Architect- Johnson Pilton Walker

This one looks like great fun. The architects have created a central void and a vast domed skylight.
A real urban testament to the money and glamour of banking (like something out of a Batman movie!).
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd5-08.htm

140507-C05-003

UTS Information Technologies Engineering Building (Broadway)
Architect- Denton Corker Marshall (DCM)

I’m not sure how this will turn out. It is pretty cool to look at, but it’s such an ugly monolithic metallic slug on such an important site that I think in ten years time it may be reviled (especialy if the cladding rusts). Cubist marshmallow!
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-023.htm

140507-C06-003

Urbanest student housing Wattle Street.
Architect- GROUP GSA

I’ve included this to show some interesting contextual stuff going up. Again part of the incredibly dynamic Haymarket district.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-026.htm

140507-C07-007

Dr Chau Chak Wing Building, UTS
Ultimo
Architect- Frank Gehry

Wow- my brain hurts thinking about the brickwork in this building. Indulgent but delightful (essence of architecture, right?).
Good to see an iconic education building on this site on the end of the Goods Line pathway.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-021.htm

140507-C08-007

180 Thomas Street, Haymarket.
Architect- Bates Smart

A speculative corporate response to the same site as above (Goods Line pathway), sitting on top of an existing substation.
A really good effort by Bates Smart if you ask me.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd7-025.htm

140507-C09-001

Central Park
on Broadway near Central Station
Architect- Norman Foster + Partners + Ateliers Jean Nouvel

Zipping along, needless to say…
Designed by Jean Nouvel, the development encompasses a shopping mall and apartment complex, with vertical gardens featuring on its facade.
Link- http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW15.htm

Under demolition and site prep.

140507-D01001

140507-D01009

Sydney Convention Centre
Darling Harbour
Architect- Hassell

Big things are planned for this site. After a tortuous couple of months the original Convention Centre (flagship of the eighties Darling Harbour) has all but disappeared.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/PYR/PYR17.htm

140507-D02-007

The Castlereagh
Architect- Tony Owen

More sleek plastic for downtown Sydney, to keep the overseas investors happy.
It replaces a rather staid 1920s job.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/cbd/cbd6-020.htm

140507-D03-010

33 Bligh Street
Architect- Fitzpatrick and Partners with Kannfinch

This is an ambitious and exciting building. It can get to be so high as the building itself sits on top of a large substation (to be hidden behind a huge sandstone screen).
It replaces a graceful but clapped out late sixties building.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW33.htm

140507-D04-011

333 George Street.
Architect- Crone / Grimshaw

Here’s an exciting building on a great site. It’s good to see this part of town slowly come back to life (with then night clubs, etc).
When George Street become a pedestrian area this site will soar. It will house the local branch of Marks and Sparks.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW34.htm

Recently Finished

140507-F01-014

8 Chifley
Architect- Richard Rogers of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, and Lippmann Associates in association with Mirvac Design.

Not as exciting as the renderings, but an excellent addition to the streetscape.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW18.htm

140507-F02-015

Eliza Apartments
Architect- Tony Owen

This is a wee bourgeois gem. Check out the stonework at street level- really creative.
Link- http://sydneyarchitecture.com/NEW/NEW-SM22.htm

Epilogue
This city has no shortage of capital compared to other cities, look at the dollars being spent on projects around the city this decade.
Lets see, short list I quickly compiled.
$30b transport plan from the NSW government. Light rail, North West Rail Link, M5, M4 extension etc.
$8b Green Square/Zetland
$6b Barangaroo Lend Lease contract + $1b Crown Casino
$2.5b Darling Harbour redevelopment, Lend Lease contract (this company is obviously scratching the right backs in government)
$2b Central park
$1.3b City One/Wynyard Station
$1b AMP/Circular Quay
$1b UTS redevelopments

It’s is after 10 years of non spending post Olympics.

The eighties called and they want their buildings back….!

5 Mar

I was walking through Darling Harbour last week and was shocked to see the Sydney Exhibtion Centre drifting, masts broken, like the Marie Celeste through a sea of rubble. I had heard that their deomlition was being bandied around, but I was amazed to see that the Harbour Authority would have the gall to go ahead with it.

01-marie-celeste

The Marie Celeste, mast in majestic full sail, was found wandering the sea empty of souls….

I have no problems with the demolition, personally. As a bit of a Marxist, I believe that buildings should be useful and serve the people. These buildings were the linchpin of the whole original 1988 Darling Harbour development, but they did not anticipate the populist success that DH would become. These site require buildings that are accessible and inviting, chock full of retail and entertainment possibilities (how the masses love this kind of thing) that can be entered on-grade. I hope that the new Hassell schemes allow for this.

The original Sydney Convention Centre and Sydney Exhibtion Centre were built in 1987 on the former Darling Harbour Railway Goods Yard.

02-1984

Above- the site as I first knew it in 1984, when DH was an honest “working harbour” (actually the most important port in Australia for a long time…

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Above- the forlorn masts of the old Cox Richardson Exhibition Centre sticking up, devoid of surrounding buildings, as they slip beneath the waves.

SydneyConvention02

Above- the Phillip Cox Exhibition Centre in happier times. It was always something of a white elephant.

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Above- existing, from the air.

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Above- proposed, from the air. DH is fast becoming the centre of Sydney.

06-140223-PYR17-EXIST0204

Above- John Andrews‘s Convention Centre. He likens, understandably from his point of view, its demolition to an act of vandalism.

07-140223-PYR04-PROP08

Above- the proposed replacement by Hassell. Looks like more fun at least.

09-131017-MONO-09

Above- and finally, know we know why they pulled out the perfectly functional Sydney Monorail. In the way of progress! What a grim day for the eighties!!

08-131017-MONO-56

Central Park West? New development for Parramatta downtown.

18 Dec

Here are pictures of the winning scheme for the new two 53-storey office towers, designed by Sydney firm Johnson Pilton Walker, will be built as part of the Parramatta Square redevelopment in the CBD.

I think that they look hugely like the Central Park development in the city at Broadway.

131217-PARRA-01

The buildings feature a sky terrace on the 25th floor and a sky lobby on the 27th floor which jut out from the tower, offering sweeping views to the Sydney CBD and across the west towards the Blue Mountains.

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When constructed, the commercial towers will add up to 140,000 square metres of office space to the Parramatta CBD and function as two of the key centrepieces of the three-hectare Parramatta Square site in the heart of the CBD.
The original 4 short-lited from the competition (chosen from a field of 73 designs):

01. Mario Cucinella Architects’ offering for Parramatta Square Stages 5 & 6

131217-PARRA-COMP-01

02. Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp’s design concept

131217-PARRA-COMP-02

03. Johnson Pilton Walker’s design concept

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04. Bates Smart’s design concept

131217-PARRA-COMP-04

Sydney- westies versus hipsters.

15 Dec

Sydney is a distant colonial city that prefers to source its stories from elsewhere.

131215-city_of_sydney_1888

Above- Sydney in 1888. Just the Victorian core exists (pre-car). Many areas would be recognizable today.
However, unknown to many, Sydney has a rich history and social fabric of its own.
There is a rich post-colonial, post-industrial identity mainly based on waves of immigration and class.
As with all of the east coast cities, the rich live in the cooler coastal east and the poorer “out west”.

131215-MAP-SYDNEY1

Above- demographic map of Sydney. Very telling.

131215-sydney-map

In common with all western cities built in the Victorian age, the prosperous middle classes initially inhabited a ring of hosing around the urban core and abandoned this with the invention of the motor car and commuter trains.
Inner-city Sydney declined, with some now desireable areas (eg, Paddington in the inner east) being described in the ‘thirties as “the worst white slum in the British Empire”.
Since the ‘seventies the inner city has been heavily gentrified and the working classes have been relegated to the outer western suburbs. A quick breakdown would be-

1 City
-workers, dead on the weekend. Chinatown, some fancy Victorian areas on urban fringe (Glebe, etc).

131215-TINTIN-TRANSLATION
2 Canterbury-Bankstown
-very cosmopolitan (like SW London). African blacks, Muslims, some Chinese, some rather rough looking Anglos.

131215-TINTIN-BANKSTOWN
3 Eastern Suburbs
-posh, nouveax riche, Jews, European immigrants (“I have to be near the beach…”).
4 The Forest
-the green areas of the Upper North Shore. Exclusively rich and white.
5 Hills District
-as above, not as up-market. Suburbia.
6 Inner West
-hipsters, families, recently gentrified Victorian ring. Mostly small houses.
7 Macarthur
South-west of Sydney that includes the city of Campbelltown, as well as the town of Camden and Wollondilly Shire. Working class, Anglo and some Middle-Eastern immigrants. Suburbia.
8 Northern Beaches
Nice. White, quite laid back, not too pretentious. A bit far from Sydney (on the way to the idyllic Tradie’s Central Coast).
9 Lower North Shore
Urban, architecturally similar to the Inner-West, but quite boring. No hipsters.
10 Upper North Shore
Established rich. Grand, free standing Federation houses. Some blocks of flats being built along the highway, and has some large Chinese areas (eg- Chatswood).
11 Northern Suburbs
As above.
12 South-eastern Sydney
Includes Botany (the birth place of Australia), Kensington and the airport zone. Industrial, working class.
13 South-western Sydney
City of Canterbury, City of Bankstown, City of Liverpool, City of Fairfield, City of Campbelltown and Camden Council. Solidly working class. Lots of fibro houses, etc. Big post-war boom areas. Quite a few Lebanese, etc.
14 Southern Sydney
Kogarah, Sutherland Shire. Mostly very nice lower middle class Anglo areas. Some large Chinese areas (Kogarah, etc).
15 St George
As above.

131215-TINTIN-SHIRE
16 Western Sydney
Here be the Westies. Stretches out to Katoomba. As with South-western Sydney above.

131215-TINTIN-PENRITH

 

131215-TINTIN-PENRITH2
17. Upper Blue Mountains
-drug addicts, mountain folk.
18. Lower Blue Mountains
-Tradies, intellectual middle class priced out of Sydney. Bushfires.

 

 

 

 

 

131215-harbour-bridge

 

131215-MAP-SYDNEY2

131215-MAP-SYDNEY3

131215-sheilds-1840

Above- map from the 1840’s. Pretty much only the city and a part of Pyrmont exist.

Tintin Sydney comics by Glenn Smith
http://glenno.weirdgalaxy.com/index.php?page=blog

Central Park retail is photogenic..

17 Nov

131017-CENTRAL-01

Wow, I mean very nice, obviously. The Germans in the office swan around speaking of “European architecture”- obviously, the towers at Central Park are just boxes covered with gimicks, but wonderfully done. Quite an oasis from an otherwise chaotic part of the city. Above we see the main residentail tower (Jean Nouvel?) with its fantastic hanging gardens. At the base of this is the retail component that opened very recently.

131017-CENTRAL-02

A closer view of the shopfronts. Huge shopfronts (around five meters or fifteen feet) with a token awning above.

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Mirrored ceiling at the entry area.

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Once I got in I was pleased by the simplicity of the deign. The plain white uncomplicated ceilings and returns and the dark stone floors (becoming the norm in fashion retail..).

131017-CENTRAL-05

The ceiling has a vast skylight with about a foot of water held on top- the small waves make the light shimmer.
The interior was done by PTW, with the original concept done by the Buchan Group.

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There is a rather alluring mysterious ivy surrounded escalator heading down into the depths, but my impulse was to climb.

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A lot of the fashion retail has some pared-back, sophisticated design. I love the exposed services here.

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Simple candy stripes.

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The food court is up a couple of levels. It’s still quiet and being fitted out, but I expect that this will become a very popular space.

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Arty….

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Out the back, the bottom supermarket level connects through to a wonderful outdoor courtyard. This is also surrounded by food offerings and is filled with hip brazilian music. Again, I expect that this will become a great space.

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And finally we look up to be reminded just how freaking hip this building is.

FJMT's $220m Charles Perkins Centre – The University of Sydney

24 Sep

FJMT continue on their winning streak with this ultra-industrial gleaming alpolic and sandstone clad structure.

Modernist Brutalism is coming back in, fat camp style.

Budget- $220 million
Architect- FJMT
Builder- Brookfield Multiplex

SU99-16

Artist’s rendering (copyright FJMT)

SU99-01

 

The building is a standard reinforced concrete construction with an interesting cladding mixture of aluminium composite panel (alpolic), sandstone and glass. The sandstone side attempts (!) to enter a dialogue with the Gothic St John’s College opposite. Its machine-like Brutalist design states clearly that it is a building of laboratories and research.

SU99-07

 

The University of Sydney spent $220 million on a new research and education centre that will focus on the diagnosis and treatment of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

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The cash for the project was raised through a combination of a government infrastructure bond and private university funding.
Covering 46,700 square metres the area is equal to a 30-storey office block, or similar to the Sydney Cricket Ground.

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Once completed it will be home to about 950 researchers and 1455 undergraduates with a variety of laboratory spaces, clinical research facilities and a biobank.

SU99-14 SU99-15
Links
http://sydney.edu.au/perkins/building_project/background.shtml
http://www.smh.com.au/business/fat-budget-for-sydney-uni-research-centre-20120307-1ujsx.html
http://www.brookfieldmultiplex.com/projects/australasia/nsw/construction_and_development/health/under_construction/charles_perkins_centre/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Perkins_(Aboriginal_activist)